Three-dimensional structure of straight and curved plane wakes
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Three-dimensional structure of straight and curved plane wakes

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center, Stanford University, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Moffett Field, Calif, Stanford, Calif, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Wakes (Aerodynamics)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesThree dimensional structure of straight and curved plane wakes.
Statementby James H. Weygant, and Rabindra D. Mehta.
Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA CR-194420.
ContributionsMehta, R. D., Ames Research Center.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14701108M

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Although the plane wake is marked by the formation of strong spanwise vortices, the initially two-dimensional Karman-like vortices soon develop a three-dimensional structure in the form of secondary streamwise vortices. So far, this streamwise vortex structure has been studied mostly through flow visualization and at relatively low Reynolds : Rabindra D. Mehta and James H. Weygandt.   The three-dimensional evolution of a plane mixing layer: the Kelvin–Helmholtz rollup. The Kelvin–Helmholtz rollup of three-dimensional temporally evolving plane mixing layers with an initial Reynolds number of based on vorticity thickness and half the velocity difference have been simulated by: An experimental investigation has been conducted on the three-dimensional structure of curved plane wakes developing from tripped and untripped initial boundary layers. The effects of mild. Both two- and three-dimensional disturbances are considered. The shear layer mode and the wake mode, previously found in a plane shear layer with a wake component in the mean velocity profile, are also found in the corresponding curved shear by: 5.

Although the plane wake is marked by the formation of strong spanwise vortices, the initially two-dimensional Karman-like vortices soon develop a three-dimensional structure in the form of. Plane is defined as an elemental part of a vol-ume. When the surfaces on a volume have clearly defined edges so you can discern its shape and contours, a plane is delineated. Plane has lines and points as its elemental parts. A plane can also exist independantly in space and is a 2-dimensional ele-ment expressing width and Size: 3MB. The time required for a change of characteristic spanwise scale with infinitesimal three-dimensional disturbances was found to be very long, requiring three or more pairings to complete a doubling of the spanwise by: Three-Dimensional Coordinate Systems Over the course of the next several lectures, we will learn how to work with locations and directions in three-dimensional space, in order to easily describe objects such as lines, planes and curves. This will set the stage for the study of functions of two variables, the graphs of which are surfaces in Size: KB.

An experimental investigation has been conducted on the three-dimensional structure of curved plane wakes developing from tripped and untripped initial boundary layers. The effects of mild stream-wise curvature on a wake generated at the trailing edge of a slowly tapering splitter plate were investigated at a Reynolds number of abAuthor: Rabindra D. Mehta and James H. Weygandt.   Centrifugal instability and the rib vortices in the cylinder wake. Abstract. The physical mechanism for generation of streamwise vortices (or rib vortices) in the cylinder wake is numerically investigated with a finite-difference by: 1. ii Acknowledgements iii List of Figures vii List of Tables xiii Nomenclature xiv Chapter 1: Introduction 1 Purpose of the Research 1 Outline of the Thesis 4 Chapter 2: Literature Review 6 Stability and Self-similarity in Mixing Layers 6 Second Moment Terms in Developing Mixing Layers 9 Development of Turbulent Mixing Layers in Highly Turbulent . SELF-SIMILARITY OF SPATIALLY-DEVELOPING THREE-DIMENSIONAL PLANE WAKES M. Javad MAGHREBI, Stephen WADE and Julio SORIA Turbulence Research Laboratory, Dept. Mechanical Engineering Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA Second International Conference on CFD in the Minerals and Process Industries CSIRO, Melbourne, .